Salt City Curl Co

A fresh start with old friends
veteran curly
cutters
colorists
Of which I count myself one
Raised to unforeseen capacity
By timing
And sweat
Sleepless weeks
Traveling
Auditions
Building pieces for shows
Mostly
By the caring
and
Somewhat labile
Hand
Which represented a desire
For authentic value
And artistic expression
Under the roof of
L’Oreal Professionnel
The unknown sun to an entire nation
Still warming the tides
Of global attention

Can’t wait to feel the energy
of
a
need bud
ready to bloom.

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Kung Fu

Taken from Wikipedia. A fast jot for a before work affair…to be continued…

Kung fu/Kungfu or Gung fu/Gongfu (Listeni/ˌkʌŋˈfuː/ or /ˌkʊŋˈfuː/; 功夫, Pinyin: gōngfu) is a Chinese term referring to any study, learning, or practice that requires patience, energy, and time to complete, often used in the West to refer to Chinese martial arts. [1] It is only in the late twentieth century, that this term was used in relation to Chinese Martial Arts by the Chinese community.[2] The Oxford English Dictionary defines the term “Kung-fu” as “a primarily unarmed Chinese martial art resembling karate.”[3] This illustrates how the meaning of this term has been changed in English. The origin of this change can be attributed to the misunderstanding or mistranslation of the term through movie subtitles or dubbing.[2]

In its original meaning, kung fu can refer to any skill achieved through hard work and practice, not necessarily martial arts. The Chinese literal equivalent of “Chinese martial art” would be 中國武術 zhōngguó wǔshù.[4]

Originally, to practice kung fu did not just mean to practice Chinese martial arts. Instead, it referred to the process of one’s training – the strengthening of the body and the mind, the learning and the perfection of one’s skills – rather than to what was being trained. It refers to excellence achieved through long practice in any endeavor.[5] This meaning can be traced to classical writings, especially those of Neo-Confucianism, which emphasize the importance of effort in education.[6]

In the colloquial, one can say that a person’s kung fu is good in cooking, or that someone has kung fu in calligraphy; saying that a person possesses kung fu in an area implies skill in that area, which they have worked hard to develop. Someone with “bad kung fu” simply has not put enough time and effort into training, or seems to lack the motivation to do so. Kung fu is also a name used for the elaborate Fujian tea ceremony (kung fu cha).